Issue

3.2 / Occupy the Art World

October 6 2011

Introduction

October 6, 2011. The direct and barbed questions that Guillermo Gómez-Peña raises and the answers that Pablo Helguera inadvertently provides in their respective features let no one off the hook. Anyone who claims some relationship to what we collectively call the art world is complicit in how it functions, whether artist, curator, viewer, reader, or even museum guard. But if individually one's agency is hard to locate—as Christine Hill notes in the interview with Helguera, "no one wants an MFA in Futility"—there are multiple reminders in this issue that art's ability to displace its audience is sometimes catalyst enough. Whether it is Allen Ruppersberg's acts of narrative reclamation, Kurt Schwitters' destroyed but still evocative Merzbau, or intervening amongst the dead in Ever After, art puts one in a strange place that can be hard to return from. Enjoy—PM.

Features

Interview with Pablo Helguera

Interview with Pablo Helguera

By Bad at Sports

So the solution is not simply to emphasize a craft of any kind, but in my view, to teach the ways in which a variety of crafts or disciplines function. An architect is not required to understand all the specifics of plumbing or be an expert in welding. There are many disciplines that don’t require you to completely master them in order to gain a certain kind of understanding of how they work.

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Profiles

Allen Ruppersberg

Allen Ruppersberg

By Elyse Mallouk

Ruppersberg’s work has had tremendous influence on artists operating in the hazily defined territory of the public sphere.

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Reviews

Shotgun