Issue

2.4 / Ghosts

October 28 2010

Introduction

October 28, 2010. As Renny Pritikin notes in his review of Hauntology at the UC Berkeley Art Museum, haunting is not tied to the past in the way one might anticipate; it has meaning only in the present. A ghost demands to be accounted for as part of current cultural formation. The sociologist Avery Gordon notes that its motivations are to “force a something that must be done that structures the domain of the present and the prerogatives of the future.”1 In Tammy Rae Carland’s conversation with Bad at Sports and Matthew H. Tedford’s review of Huckleberry Finn, there are echoes of this idea—the extent to which the residue of personal and cultural identity formation remains with us and binds us, long after we believe it has the power to do so. Enjoy – PM.

1. Avery Gordon, Ghostly Matters: Haunting and the Sociological Imagination (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1996), p. 179.

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Interview with Tammy Rae Carland

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Reviews

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