Issue

2.22 / Summer Reading

August 4 2011

Introduction

August 4, 2011. We are in the midst of what, during my East Coast childhood, would be the long pause of summer. The heat rose off of every surface and from every body, so much so that moving was something one did reluctantly, and only after much consideration. These are perhaps conducive conditions for looking at art, at least in the way Mark Van Proyen advocates for in his review: “the only way to come to terms with this…is to silently sit there and let them slowly form themselves into consciousness.” Sally Elesby describes the same process slightly differently; for her, “the painting itself expands to contain viewers in the act of viewing.” Words don’t get to share in the luxury of slow absorption; they require immediate and unconscious register of their meaning. But assembled together well, they open up space around an object, and suddenly it is there. Enjoy - PM

Features

Conversation with Sally Elesby

Conversation with Sally Elesby

By Bruno Fazzolari

This landscape doesn’t seem “realistic” because the shapes are so abstracted and streamlined. Even so, the painting has a lot of space in it. The landscape seems “real” enough for viewers to imagine themselves inside it, while the painting itself expands to contain viewers in the act of viewing.

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San Francisco and the Art World of Tomorrow, Part 3

San Francisco and the Art World of Tomorrow, Part 3

By Zachary Royer Scholz

Within this shifting paradigm, San Francisco’s exhibition venues, rather than simply continuing to present art from the rest of the world to San Francisco, can begin to turn their programming toward the critical task of making San Francisco’s art visible to the rest of the world.

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Reviews

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